Base Conditions

The sheeting or panels of a steel building must be properly attached to the foundation by way of a base condition. The base provides the lower anchor for the wall panels and will determine how the panels connect to the foundation. The base condition also prevents water and pests from getting into the metal building.
 

Buck Steel offers several options of base conditions depending on the situation and need of the project. The different base options are described below along with and illustration to better guide you in determining the base condition best suited for your project.

formed base trim

Formed Base Trim

This single piece system provides both a ledge for the panel to sit atop as well as an attachment point to the slab.  It require less labor to install especially on very large metal building projects. Formed base trim comes standard on Buck Steel construction and make installing wall panels easier. This trim will allow you to save money on the foundation while saving time installing wall panels. Formed base trim also seals the bottom of the building better than the foam closure strips. Formed base Trim prevents pests instructions. The painted components will match the trim or wall panels.
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Formed Base Trim
metal building formed base trim

Formed Base Trim

Alternate view of formed base trim.
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Formed Base Trim
formed base trim with closure strips

Formed Base Trim

Alternate view of formed base trim showing closure strips.
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Formed Base Trim with Closure Strip
formed base trim with leanto

Formed Base Trim with Leanto

Using formed base trim creates a special situation when a leanto is also involved in a steel building project. Because of the way the formed base trim lips over the edge of the concrete slab for the main building - the leanto slab must be poured 2" BELOW the base elevation of the main slab. Since the leanto columns will remain at the same height as the main building slab (referred to as base elevation of 100'0") the 2" difference must be made up for by the use of a concrete pedestal - which will allow the base plates of the leanto columns to remain at base elevation of 100'0".

This simple concept is often misunderstood or ignored by concrete contractors - which results in problems during erecting.
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Formed Base Trim with Leanto
leanto recessed slab with concrete pedestal

Formed Base Trim with Leanto

A closeup view of the concrete pedestal discussed in the previous slide.
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Formed Base Trim with Leanto
recessed leanto slab showing formed base trim

Formed Base Trim with Leanto

A closeup view of the recessed leanto slab.
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Formed Base Trim with Leanto
base angle with flashing

Base Angle with Flashing

This preferred method uses a siloconized polyester painted trim piece for the wall paneling to sit atop. This design prevents the bottom of the wall panel from coming in direct contact with the concrete, reducing the risk of corrosion. The purpose of base angle flashing is to direct moisture to the exterior and prevent moisture from deteriorating steel angles and other building components.
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Base Angle with Flashing
base angle with flashing

Base Angle with Flashing

Alternate view of base angle with flashing.
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Base Angle with Flashing
base angle with concrete notch

Base Angle with Notch

This method requires the metal building slab to be poured 3” wider and 3” longer than the actual length of the steel building to allow for a  1-1/2”  x 1-1 ½” notch that the wall sheets sit in.  Attachment of the panel is accomplished by use of a 2” x 4” base angle fastened directly to the buildings slab with masonry fasteners.
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Base Angle with Notch

Base Angle with Notch

Alternate view of base angle with notch.
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Base Angle with Notch
base channel with flashing

Base Channel with Flashing

A base channel matching the size of the girt above it (typically 8” width) is used in applications where an interior liner panel is being used on the steel building. The inside leg of the “C” channel provides a place to fasten the bottom of the liner by way of a self drilling screw. Base channels are used in conjunction with liner panels or are optional with stem walls. When used with liner panels, the inside of the base channel is used to attach the bottom of the liner panel. Base channel can be used with a stem wall if the wall is not poured solid with concrete. If a stem wall is hollow, you will not be able to use standard base angle and you will need to opt for this base channel.
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Base Channel with Flashing

Base Channel with Flashing

Alternate view of base channel with flashing.
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Base Channel with Flashing
base channel with concrete notch

Base Channel with Notch

A base channel matching the size of the girt above it (typically 8” width) is used in applications where an interior liner panel is being used on the steel building. The inside leg of the “C” channel provides a place to fasten the bottom of the liner by way of a self drilling screw. Base channels are used in conjunction with liner panels or are optional with stem walls. When used with liner panels, the inside of the base channel is used to attach the bottom of the liner panel. Base channel can be used with a stem wall if the wall is not poured solid with concrete. If a stem wall is hollow, you will not be able to use standard base angle and you will need to opt for this base channel.
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Base Channel with Notch

Base Channel with Notch

Alternate view of base channel with notch.
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Base Channel with Notch
lowered girt with flashing

Lowered Base Girt with Flashing

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Lowered Base Girt with Flashing

Lowered Base Girt with Flashing

Alternate view of lowered base girt with flashing.
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Lowered Base Girt with Flashing
lowered girt with concrete notch

Lowered Base Girt with Notch

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Lowered Base Girt with Notch

Lowered Base Girt with Notch

Alternate view of base girt with notch.
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Lowered Base Girt with Notch

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